November 2018

I couldn’t resist using some more coloured leaves for the desktop calendar. I love how the red and green remind us that Christmas isn’t very far off. Have you started holiday shopping?

If you’d like to have the calendar for your cell phone, you can save this one:
Last month, I posted some instructions for putting the image on your lock screen in case you need it.

For different desktop ratios, go here.

Painted leaves

We have been enjoying some of the most colourful scenery this fall. The maples, the definite minority tree here, are bursting with more shades of green, yellow, orange and red than ever. These in particular caught my eye.

Alternate desktop resolutions are available in the Free Calendar drop down menu.

Just because I love this so much, I made a version for my smart phone lock screen.

10-2018

On an iPhone, to make this your lock screen image, save the image to your photos. Go to Settings, Wallpaper, then Choose a New Wallpaper. The image should be the most recent in All Photos. Select it, then Set. You can choose to have it as your lock screen or be the background behind all the app icons (home screen) or both. Sorry android users, you’ll have to figure yours out on your own.

Happy Fall, y’all!

2019 Calendar

My 4″ x 6″ calendars for 2019 are now available for purchase from me directly, The Gallery in Ignace Plaza as well as in the North Woods Motor Inn lobby. They are $12 each with magnetic clip or $10 without.

Feel free to capture the appropriate image each month next year and save to your mobile phone lock screen for a handy reference.

01-2019
Moon rise over Lake Superior
02-2019
Ice out on Agimak Lake
03-2019
Full moon rising at sunset
04-2019
April shower droplets
05-2019
Spring flowers
06-2019
Gentle stream near Sowden Lake
07-2019
Ignace Airways Otter off Agimak Lake
08-2019
Wild blueberries
09-2019
Dancing aurora over Ignace
10-2019
Cone Flower
11-2019
Sunrise at Sowden Lake
12-2019
Snowy high bush cranberries

Summer into Fall

Photographing waterfalls with the silky effect is fairly simple. You need a camera in which you can adjust the shutter speed and a tripod or some way to immobilize the camera. A remote shutter or time delay helps ensure the camera doesn’t move during the shot. Preferred conditions are actually gloomy: cloudy, calm and wet! Colours in our environment are most vibrant just after a rain; saturated physically and visually.

free desktop calendar September 2018_1440x900

Although in the image it doesn’t appear sunny, the effect of the rising sun is just evident in the upper right background. The trees, though lush and green appear to be yellow. For a September calendar, that worked out perfectly. For screen resolution options, go here.

Raleigh Falls, pictured here, runs north so looking up the falls, we look into a bright white sky. At this angle it almost appears that the water is an extension of that whiteness. Unless I was able to be there when dark storm clouds are passing by, I have to take it as it is or angle the shot differently. A graduated neutral density filter may help but I don’t yet have that in my collection of accessories.

Here’s a helpful ‘when and how’ article about filters in landscape photography. Of the many types on the market, I currently only have a circular polarizing filter. This has a rotating ring that increases or decreases the amount of reflection or glare. The two straight-out-of-the-camera shots below were taken with identical settings; the only difference is rotation of the polarizing filter! Reflection is enhanced at one end and practically eliminated on the other.

Polarizing Filter Effect

I’m looking forward to visiting Raleigh often in the next few weeks. I love fall at the falls!

 

You quack me up!

Having recently discovered a beaver dam in the creek near my home, I took a chance early one morning to photograph it in the morning air, hopefully misty morning air. Although the night had not been cold enough to create the mood, I hiked there anyway.

I was surprised and delighted to find who beat me there.

Tranquil perch

This mallard was not alone. How many do you see?

They nibbled a while then drifted downstream past me. A couple hung around and ‘quacked’ me up with their antics.

 

 

Just water off a ducks back. 😉

Launch at dawn

Any day you get to head out on the water is a good day! Hope August brings such days for you. Enjoy!

Bridge to no where field trip

The next nearest community west of where I live is Dryden with a population of almost 8000. Since my town has about 1200, Dryden offers some stuff Ignace doesn’t. A camera club is one of the activities that draws me there.

Recently I was able to attend a Dryden Camera Club meeting which included a field trip to a local park that has a suspension bridge over the river running through town. A club member referred to it as the ‘bridge to no where’ because you cross over to a platform on the other shore then have to return.

The bridge was of little interest to me to photograph but I did cross it (twice). The moving water was of much more appealing to shoot. There were a few significant challenges, however. The setting sun created harsh contrast even the neutral density filters hardly reduced. Man-made structures up stream and down stream were numerous so we worked at tightening the shot.

I was pleased with the composition in the above shot (85mm, 1.0 sec, f/20, ISO 100). I really liked how the white in the foreground rock mimicked the layers of white water on the background ridges but disappointed to discover upon upload that the foreground was not in focus. Even though I shot at f/20, I had focused in the middle of the scene instead of the lower third (explained a club member). It would have been easy to take a second image right away with better placed focal point or another with the foreground perfectly clear then blend the images in post processing. Next time.

When I uploaded the images, I had to look very closely to see if what I thought were animal faces were really animals. Do you see any in the upper image?

This was taken with my 17-55mm for a wider shot, closer to the edge and better focus. It was about a half hour later and the sun had set. (42mm, 13 sec, f/22, ISO 100) I got the clarity I wanted but the change in lens and angle created a much bigger gap between the rocky layers.

I pulled both images into Photoshop to layer the best of both images but the difference in the smoothness of the water and the focus vs out of focus grasses on the lower left were beyond my current skills (and time required) to tackle.

By the way, here’s where I thought I saw something seeing me…